Paul Sloan on “What makes a good Biblical Scholar or Theologian?”

Photo credit: Houston Baptist University

Sometimes you just need four concise points to deliver a compelling message. Paul Sloan does that for us in this week’s edition of “What makes a good biblical scholar or theologian?”


“Fascination with the project” – if you’re not interested in the topic you’re researching, you’ll burn out.

“Purposeful reading” – i.e. aimless reading won’t stick.

“Flesh and blood conversation partners” – i.e. having someone you can talk to about your ideas is essential both for processing information and conjuring continued love of the work.

“Discipline”

~Paul Sloan, Assistant Professor of Theology, Houston Baptist University


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Written by
Tavis Bohlinger

Dr. Tavis Bohlinger is Editor-in-Chief of the Logos Academic Blog and Creative Director at Reformation Heritage Books. He holds a PhD from Durham University and writes across multiple genres, including academia, poetry, and screenwriting. He lives in Grand Rapids with his wife and three children.

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3 comments
  • “Flesh and blood conversation partners” – i.e. having someone you can talk to about your ideas is essential both for processing information and conjuring continued love of the work.
    I note the above. But it is difficult to get someone to talk to constructively.

  • So sad! God is not mentioned! That is exactly the problem with theologians and the whole seminary system. It is disconnected from God, from the Church, which is God’s design and plan for all His children to grow in the knowledge and understanding of Him; our creator, our sustainer, our savior. It is no wonder so many men who go through seminary have so many problems at home and in their ministries after they graduate.

Written by Tavis Bohlinger
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